Eternal Rising of the Sun

Eternal Rising of the Sun

When we meet Gina Devine she tells us that dance is an escape into fantasy and self-delusion. As a child, she watched her mother’s furtive sways to Bruce Springsteen over the kitchen sink and dreamt of happiness and fame. Now that she is a mother and surrounded by abusive males and bitchy females, she wants more than late night dance-floor fantasies fuelled by lager, vodka and acid-dipped ecstasy tablets. It’s what lures her to Anton’s contemporary dance classes under the fluorescent glare of the community centre. Amy Conroy’s excellent script follows on last year’s success, with a stuttering emotional rhythm that slowly coalesces and mirrors Gina’s growing self-confidence. Her riveting portrayal shows Gina choosing individuality over conformity and breaking self-destructive habits passed down generations. The monologue takes a swipe at many things along the way, but ultimately shows us how to our transform our own private dances into public dances.